News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

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Goodsy
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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#196 Post by Goodsy » Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:55 pm

seems like investments are coming in thick and fast these days
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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#197 Post by monotonehell » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:21 pm

Spurdo wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:11 pm
Bigger than LNG? SA to get first "green hydrogen" plant
<JokeInPoorTaste> Oh! The humanity! </JokeInPoorTaste>

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#198 Post by Nort » Mon Feb 12, 2018 3:25 pm

Goodsy wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:55 pm
seems like investments are coming in thick and fast these days
One of the big reasons I'm hoping Labor wins at the State Election. I feel that momentum in this area is really building up in SA, but it could still be easily disrupted now. In another 2-3 years if these trends continue then it will become the new norm and it's unlikely to change regardless of who comes into power in subsequent elections.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#199 Post by rev » Mon Feb 12, 2018 4:02 pm

PeFe wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:37 pm
rev wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 12:17 am

Did you even read the article? The heading even says it.
The powers the minister now has where powers that existed when there was a state of emergency, ie to direct power geneatros(ie the companies running the power stations) to switch on and provide the needed power, even if AEMO says otherwise.
These powers have been extended into non state of emergency times, in order to prevent a state of emergency such as the whole state being blacked out.
I stand corrected, Rev , you are right, the Minister does have power to dictate operating terms to generators in South Australia.
So again, with the extreme heat and obviously extra demand that that induces, we haven’t had a major or widespread blackout this summer. Why?
Because more generation is available.....(and maybe demand is lower than expected). I do not know the exact figures, but I would say there is more capacity to generate electricity in January 2018 compared to January 2017. The Pelican gas plant is up and running at capacity (unlike Feb 2017), there is more solar and wind (increase in rooftop and business solar plus 1 more wind farm) plus Tesla battery plus government diesel generators.

And maybe, the business of power generation during heatwaves is better managed, the Feb 2017 blackout caused by load shedding was a major embarrassment for AMEO, they took their eye off the ball, ignoring extreme weather forecasts and underestimating power requirements.....failing to demand Pelican Point add more power to the network to prevent blackouts (when there was power available).
No wonder the South Australian government reacted with such draconian legislation......
You say we haven’t used the diesel generators or battery backup. News was a while ago that the diesel backups had been put in use a few times to prevent a blackout.
And other people have quoted AMEO reports saying that the government diesel generators have been tested (but not brought into play yet during heatwaves) and you continually assert that they have been used....
Smaller non-government generators certainly have been used.
So if we haven’t used any of it as you say, how many times has the minister used his new power?
Well if you believe the media......zero, because no media outlet has reported it and no AMEO document has indicated this has happened....
Rev, you are start to sound like a "conspiracy theorist"...."the Minister has used these new powers and NO-ONE HAS TOLD US!!! WHATS GOING ON?"
Yes, and I recall there being news that the government diesel generators had to be turned on and used to "keep the lights on" several times. Of course if I could find that article I'd have posted it.
No shit they've been turned on to be tested. Duhh.

Again with the conspiracy nonsense. Mate, it's a simple damn question. If you don't have an answer, then be quiet.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#200 Post by Waewick » Tue Feb 13, 2018 7:56 am

Nort wrote:
Goodsy wrote:
Mon Feb 12, 2018 1:55 pm
seems like investments are coming in thick and fast these days
One of the big reasons I'm hoping Labor wins at the State Election. I feel that momentum in this area is really building up in SA, but it could still be easily disrupted now. In another 2-3 years if these trends continue then it will become the new norm and it's unlikely to change regardless of who comes into power in subsequent elections.
I think the Australian Coal party could get elected and it wouldnt change the trajectory.


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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#201 Post by Bob H » Tue Feb 13, 2018 2:19 pm

I keep an eye on energy generation stats daily.

I do not recall either of the SA emergency generators being used in production since they completed testing at the start of summer.

On some recent extreme days during Jan/Feb other liquid fuel generators were used in some capacity, for example Dry Creek, Lonsdale & Angaston. At the same time Pelican Point was not used past 90% and Torrens Island averaged less than 75% on those days, but some turbines there did touch around 90% for part of the extreme days.

There is a common misconception in the SA local paper that there is not enough generation capacity to cover state needs - that is not entirely correct. If SA fossil fuel generators were all running at 90% there would only be a hand full of days extra energy would need to be imported via the two interconnectors. Capacity and the existing AEMO bidding process for generators are not the same thing. Additionally , the problem is Natural Gas being expensive due to us paying approx three times for own gas than North Asia does for the same Australian NG through LNG exports, and SA generation currently is lopsided towards Gas. SA Cooper Basin NG is pumped into the National NG Hub which feeds other states for domestic use in addition to SA, plus piped to the Gladstone QLD LNG plant for processing & export. It is better to source as much energy for generation elsewhere than use the gas for everyday generation - this is the void rapidly being taken up by renewables and to date from other generation sources interstate that are cheaper than gas. However it should be noted that Gas Peaking plants are far more effective than exiting Coal plants when required to provide peaks and FCAS services, so Gas Peaking Plants need to be part of the mix in the long term until renewable storage is more advanced and in the amounts required.

There are other complexities in the AEMO. AEMC & NEM that are too detailed to go into - bext to keep it at high level and provide a couple of links so you can track the basic info of the past few days here:

http://opennem.org.au/#/

In the first link click on the 'All Regions' link and an option for South Australia appears. Hold the mouse over a particular time window or holding the mouse at the end of the chart/graph will provide the last 7 days summary.

http://nemlog.com.au/gen/region/

In the second link go to SA1 graphs & tables. The two emergency power plants (generators) currently connected to diesel are labelled as 'SATGN' and 'SATGS'.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#202 Post by Norman » Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:32 pm

Power blackouts in the inner north blamed on high-density housing
Dan Jervis-Bardy, The City
February 13, 2018 4:25pm

OVERWHELMING demand for electricity caused by high-density housing and extreme hot weather has been blamed for “several” blackouts in Prospect.

SA Power Networks wrote to property owners on Prospect Rd, Pulsford Rd and Milner St this month blaming extreme heat and high demand as a “result of higher density development and recent installations of large airconditioning units” for “several power interruptions” in the past year.

This included blackouts on January 18 and 28, despite the State Government claiming at the time the state’s power system coped “extremely well” during the extreme heat.

Energy Minister Tom Koutsantonis said the blackouts were “unacceptable” and would be investigated by the state’s essential services commission.

The blackouts raise questions about the capacity of the power network to cope with increased demand amid a high-density housing boom in the inner north.

A total of 70 apartment projects have been approved on Prospect, Churchill and Main North roads since the State Government raised building heights on the corridors in 2013.

Customer services manager Paul Erwin said in the letter, the energy distributor has not met the “standard of service (it) expects to deliver” for customers in the inner north, as it pledged major power upgrades to improve reliability in time for next summer.

On January 17, ahead of the two forecast 40+C days, Energy Minister Tom Koutsantonis said: “In terms of capacity, we’ll be fine. Turn on your airconditioners. It will be OK.”

But the letter reveals the power did go out in Prospect on January 18.

This blackout was followed by another power outage in Prospect on January 28, which SA Power Networks had attempted to avoid by transferring “several properties on to other parts of the network” to reduce load ahead of forecast extreme hot weather during the Australia Day long weekend.

The City understands the January 28 power outage was caused by a mechanical fault.

Mr Koutsantonis said his comments on January 17 related to whether SA had enough energy supply to meet demand during last month’s heatwave, which he said “of course we did”.

He said although localised power failures were unavoidable, “people would expect that power providers can manage demand, even at times of high heat”.

SA Power Networks spokesman Paul Roberts said existing transformers would be “up-rated” to deal with supply issues in the short-term.

Mr Roberts said SA Power Networks would then spend $200,000 to upgrade powerlines and install two new transformers in time for next summer.

Adelaide Liberal MP Rachel Sanderson, whose electoral office is on Prospect Rd, said the situation was “totally unacceptable”.

“Better co-ordination between the State Government, Prospect Council and SA Power Networks could have prevented the blackouts,” Ms Sanderson said.
SA Power Networks has again failed to deliver in the area of planning and forecasting. You would think that, given the high number of new developments, that they would have upgraded the infrastructure concurrently.

I hope they also start upgrading transformers and lines around the other major development hotspots, such as the area around Henley Beach Road, Tonsley, Bowden, St. Clair and Port Adelaide.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#203 Post by SBD » Tue Feb 13, 2018 10:57 pm

Norman wrote:
Tue Feb 13, 2018 8:32 pm
SA Power Networks has again failed to deliver in the area of planning and forecasting. You would think that, given the high number of new developments, that they would have upgraded the infrastructure concurrently.

I hope they also start upgrading transformers and lines around the other major development hotspots, such as the area around Henley Beach Road, Tonsley, Bowden, St. Clair and Port Adelaide.
Tonsley would likely be fine, as there is sufficient infrastructure to run a factory that isn't operating any more. St Clair undoubtedly consumes significantly more electricity than a racetrack, but there used to be industry nearby, so it's possible it's a fairly minor job to ensure suitable capacity. Greenfields developments tend to get planned for that too. The Prospect situation might arise in Henley Beach Road, Glenelg or Anzac Highway where there are gradual new developments increasing the demand a bit at a time until suddenly everything calls at once and the wires melt.

A greenfield development might be able to be billed for the new infrastructure to provide it with electricity. It would be unreasonable to charge little-to-nothing for each new little redevelopment until the one that crosses some arbitrary planning threshold and "sorry, that will be an extra half a million dollars on the cost of your granny flat". I don't know if the cost of forward projected future development can be determined accurately enough to bill someone now for their share of a potential future upgrade that will be required if or when all of their neighbours also build new apartment blocks.

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Re: News & Discussion: Electricity Infrastructure

#204 Post by PeFe » Thu Feb 15, 2018 12:48 am

New solar farm at Tailem Bend about to begin construction.

From Renew Economy
Equis gets finance for 127MW solar farm in South Australia

Image

Singapore-based Equis Energy says it has achieved financial close on its 127MW Tailem Bend solar project in South Australia, and intends to begin construction later this month, with completion expected in 12 months.

The project was first announced last February, when Equis said it had signed a 22-year power purchase agreement for all the output with Snowy Hydro. But it has only now reached financial close.

Equis now says it also plans to develop Tailem Bend 2, an additional 111MW solar project adjacent to the first stage of the solar farm to be built some 100kms south east of Adelaide.

It says Tailem Bend will already be one of the lowest cost solar farms in Australia and the second stage will bring prices down further because of the shared infrastructure.

Its initial announcement included plans by Snowy Hydro to build a 28.8MW diesel generator to support the solar farm, but the new announcement makes no mention of that. (A recent AFR story says the plans were thwarted by “technical demands” from the Australian Energy Market Operator).

Instead, Equis says it has reserved land at the site to accommodate a future battery installation with storage of up to 100MWh.

“Australia represents one of the most exciting solar power generation markets globally and Equis expects to build over $1 billion of new projects over the next 24-36 months,” director David Russell said in a statement.

“As Asia’s largest renewable energy developer, Equis is able to leverage its economies of scale to deliver large scale, low-cost, reliable renewable energy, which Australia needs, as well as providing employment opportunities and supporting economic growth in local communities.”

The projects continue the big push into big solar in South Australia, which already sources about half of its electricity from large scale wind farms and rooftop solar.

Full article : http://reneweconomy.com.au/equis-gets-f ... lia-55308/

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